In Against the Fascist Creep (2017), Alexander Reid Ross summarizes the history of the fascist political and cultural movement from its beginnings in Italy in the early 20th century, and up to recent political developments and elections in Europe and US. He iterates the leading figures and key organizations which have influenced and developed the fascists ideology and thinking over the last hundred years in Europe and US.

A key argument in Ross’ narrative is the idea that fascists and extreme right politics and members have co-opted the left, either by borrowing its tactics or infiltrating its ranks. He provides several examples of where there have been cross-over between extreme left and right groups, and several key members who have “switched sides” either way. The problem with that argument, is that it intermingles ideology, political goals and tactical means. Fringe groups of any kind usually share at least one enemy: the establishment; as Ross also mentions. As under-powered forces, they tend to use similar tactics of asymmetrical resistance and independent loosely coupled and distributed cells as opposed to a central organization. However, the similar tactics and politics does not equate similar ideology.

Throughout the book, Ross seems to lump all and any group or opinion which might have any relation, however tangent, to fascism under the same banner. This creates a polarized view, which is unfortunate, and sometimes leaves questions-marks with some of the facts.

For especially interested only

Ross offers a well researched, thoroughly referenced summary of the fascist history. However, the narrative gets somewhat uninteresting as organization after organization, country after country, and people and relations are iterated through. What is probably lacking is the analysis into the bigger picture and political context. And where there is analysis, it comes with a hint of bias, to support the “fascist creep” argument.

The topic Ross cover is very relevant, especially given most recent events in the US. However, beyond iterating names and groups, the book does not analyze the problem let alone any solution.

If you are particularly interested in the history, organizations and key figures in fascism, this book offers a good summary. Otherwise, it’s a rather boring read, and can better be skipped.